Civil disobedience: It worked for Gandhi and King, so how about today?

Wednesday, February 13, 2019 3:10 PM

USFSP Student Center
USFSP University Student Center
200 6th Ave S.
St. Petersburg, FL 33701

Topic Panelists

Prudence Bushnell
Ambassador (Ret.) Prudence Bushnell is the author of the recently published story, Terrorism, Betrayal and Resilience: My Story of the 1998 US Embassy Bombings. In it she recounts policy and leadership lessons acquired as a U.S. foreign service officer in India, Senegal, Kenya, Guatemala and Washington, D.C. As Deputy Assistant Secretary in the Africa Bureau (1998-96) and Ambassador to the Republics of Kenya and Guatemala (1996-2002) she practiced the leadership she preached as a management and leadership trainer before joining government service. Her efforts as a Washington policy-maker to bring attention to the 1994 genocide in Rwanda were featured in the 2005 film, Sometimes in April, in which she is portrayed by actress Debra Winger. As ambassador to Kenya, Pru led the community's response to the 1998 Al Qaeda bombing of the US embassy in Nairobi, which was recognized with the Department's Award for Heroism. Glamour magazine named her one of the Top Ten Women of the Year and Vanity Fair magazine featured her in its Hall of Fame in 1998. During her final State Department assignment as Dean of the Leadership and Management School of the Foreign Service Institute, she received the Service to America Career Achievement award (2004). After leaving the Foreign Service, Pru founded the Levitt Leadership Institute at Hamilton College in Clinton, NY. She received the Rising Voice of Women Award from International Women's Associates of Chicago in 2010 and was cited as one of the 20 All Time Greatest Feds by Government Executive Magazine in 2011. Pru was born in Washington, DC and raised in Germany, France, Pakistan and Iran, while her father was a member of the US Diplomatic Corp. She holds a BS from the University of Maryland, a MS from Russell Sage College and three honorary doctorates. She has written articles on leadership for the Foreign Service Journal and a co-authored Leadership in Disaster for the Textbook of Disaster Psychiatry, Cambridge Press, 2017.
Douglas Herbert
Douglas Herbert launched his journalism career from the bedroom of his childhood home on Manhattan's Upper East Side, hand-writing the Sunday weekly, House News, for a readership of two: his mom and dad. A decade and a half later, in the early 1990s, Douglas landed his first foreign assignment, drinking his way through the vineyards of southwest France as a writer and researcher for Harvard University's student-published Let's Go travel guide. Douglas subsequently freelanced in the Moscow bureau of The New York Times, chronicling the chaotic reality of a New Russia in the wake of Soviet collapse. After reporting stints in Tallinn, Estonia and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Douglas joined CNN, initially at its financial desk in New York City and, later, at CNN International in London, covering the European Union and EU expansion. Today, Douglas is a Paris-based commentator on world affairs for France 24, an international news channel that he joined at its launch in 2006. Douglas has reported from nearly a dozen G7 and G20 summits, from Cannes to Québec to Northern Ireland; UN General Assemblies; the 2016 US presidential election campaign, from the national party conventions to Donald Trump's inauguration; and on the Ukrainian conflict. Douglas's guests on the France 24 Interview show have included Tony Blair, Samantha Power, Garry Kasparov and Stephen Breyer. For the past six years, Douglas has taught a graduate-level fact-checking course at Paris's Sciences Po Journalism School. Last November, he spent a week in Tashkent, Uzbekistan training a new generation of TV journalists in live reporting and breaking news. An avid Russophile, Douglas received his Master's Degree in Russian Studies from Harvard University. If Douglas could banish one term from the English lexicon, it would be: Fake News.
Eric Lynn
Eric Lynn served as a Senior Advisor to the Secretary of Defense and as Special Advisor on the Middle East in the Policy Office of the Secretary of Defense. He advised three U.S. Secretaries of Defense (Robert Gates, Leon Panetta and Chuck Hagel) at the Pentagon, as well as the Undersecretaries for Policy, focusing on National Security and a range of Middle East issues. In multiple roles, Eric worked personally for the Secretary of Defense and served as Senior Policy Advisor to General John Allen. While working in the Pentagon, Eric traveled overseas over 50 times with Secretaries of Defense and others for engagements with the heads of state and military leadership. Notably, Eric served as the Secretary's lead on the Iron Dome counter rocket system since its inception in 2009. He was the Secretary of Defense's representative to the State Department's Israeli-Palestinian negotiations team. A St. Petersburg, Florida native, Eric has worked extensively in National Security policy and U.S. politics. Eric served as Middle East Policy Advisor to President Barack Obama in 2007- 2008. He advised President Obama on national security, Middle East policy and coordinated outreach to the Jewish community nationwide. Previously, Eric practiced law as an attorney in Florida and Washington DC, working on public policy, litigation, and regulatory work. He served on senior policy staff in Congress, as a top advisor on foreign policy and defense. Eric led international Congressional delegations and advised Members of Congress on a range of legislative issues within the Energy and Commerce Committee. Since leaving the Department of Defense, Eric runs a strategic consulting business, serving clients with such diverse needs as national security strategy, international dynamics, and business strategy. This includes work with current and former Military Leadership and high ranking international officials. Eric studied International Relations, History and Business at Northwestern University, studied at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and holds a law degree from Georgetown University. He and his wife, Tracy, have two young children.
Manu Samnotra
Manu Samnotra is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of South Florida. He received his B.A. in Economics and Politics from Ithaca College, in Ithaca, NY, an M.A. in Politics from the New School for Social Research in New York, NY, and his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Florida, in Gainesville, FL. He has been living in the Tampa Bay area since 2015. Dr. Samnotra's research interests bridge European and Indian traditions of political thought. Specifically, he has published on the work of the political theorist Hannah Arendt, and is currently finishing on a book that focuses on the role of shame in political societies. He is also writing on the political significance on M.K. Gandhi from whom, Samnotra argues, we might learn new ways of practicing human dignity.