Let's talk Canadian exceptionalism.

Wednesday, February 13, 2019 3:10 PM

USFSP Student Center
USFSP University Student Center
200 6th Ave S.
St. Petersburg, FL 33701

Topic Panelists

Raymond Arsenault
Raymond Arsenault is the John Hope Franklin Professor of Southern History at the University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, where he has taught since 1980. A specialist in the political, social, environmental, and civil rights history of the American South, he has also taught at the University of Minnesota, Brandeis University, the University of Chicago, the Florida State University Study Abroad Center in London, and the Universite d'Angers, in France, where he was a Fulbright Lecturer in 1984-85. A native of Cape Cod, he was educated at Princeton University and Brandeis University, where he received his Ph.D. in 1981. He served as Associate Director of the Fulbright Commission Summer Institute in American Studies from 1980 to 1988, and he has lectured on American history and culture in a number of countries, including France, Great Britain, Belgium, Germany, Greece, Norway, Iceland, Turkey, Tunisia, and Jordan. Arsenault is the author or editor of eight books, including The Wild Ass of the Ozarks: Jeff Davis and the Social Bases of Southern Politics (1984); Crucible of Liberty: 200 Years of the Bill of Rights (1991); The Changing South of Gene Patterson: Journalism and Civil Rights, 1960-1968 (2002), co-edited with Roy Peter Clark; Paradise Lost? The Environmental History of Florida (2006), co-edited with Jack E. Davis; Freedom Riders: 1961 and the Struggle for Racial Justice (2006); and The Sound of Freedom: Marian Anderson, the Lincoln Memorial, and the Concert That Awakened America (2009). His most recent book, co-edited with Orville Vernon Burton, is Dixie Redux: Essays in Honor of Sheldon Hackney (2013). Freedom Riders, published by Oxford University Press, was awarded the 2007 Frank L. and Harriet C. Owsley Prize of the Southern Historical Association, as the most important book published in the field of Southern history in 2006. The abridged version of Freedom Riders, published in 2011, is the companion volume to the acclaimed American Experience documentary film Freedom Riders, which won three Emmys and a George Peabody Award. His latest book, Arthur Ashe: A Life, was just published by Simon & Schuster.
Susan Harper
Prior to moving to Miami, Ms. Harper held two consecutive positions in Global Affairs Canada in Ottawa: Director General and Senior Arctic Official (2013-16) and Director General, Trade and Technical Barriers (2009-13). In 2004, she had been posted to the Embassy of Canada in Washington, DC, where she became Minister (Economic) in 2008. She had previously been Ambassador in Montevideo, Uruguay (2001-04), after having held trade positions in Yaounde', Paris and Buenos Aires. Before joining the Government of Canada, Ms. Harper taught at both Cambrian College in Sudbury, and George Brown College in Toronto. Susan has two children, who keep her academic, financial management and diplomatic skills honed.
Bruce Mabley
Bruce Mabley is a retired Canadian diplomat having served abroad in Paris, Islamabad, Cairo, Amman and Ankara. Dr. Mabley has also taught Philosophy and Political Science at Laval, McGill, Carleton and Concordia universities. He holds a Doctorat in Philosophy (thesis: La pensée politique d'Albert Camus) from Université Laval in Québec City. In 2003, he was accepted in the Faculty of Law to perform post-doctoral work in Islamic Law and Politics until 2006. During a hiatus in his diplomatic career from 1991-2006, Dr. Mabley was first appointed as Director of International Affairs at Concordia University. He then launched a private sector educational consulting and services company called EDUC-INTER and secured World Bank funding for offices in Mexico City and Panama. His company organized internships abroad for Canadian students under the auspices of Foreign Affairs Canada. EDUC-INTER was also responsible for implementing the National Graduate Registry in Central American universities. This project was designed to streamline human resources practices, stimulate youth employment and increase competitiveness. In early 2000, Dr. Mabley was decorated by the French government with the Chevalier des Palmes académiques for his academic cooperation work in bringing together French, Quebec and Canadian universities. Since his retirement from the Foreign Service in October 2015, Dr. Mabley has written extensively for newspapers, web sites, think tanks and magazines on international affairs topics such as the Syrian conflict, Turkish politics and foreign policy, Canadian foreign service reform, NAFTA Renegotiation, Canadian foreign policy and a variety of other international issues.