To the UK: rethink Brexit!  

Thursday, February 14, 2019 9:00 AM

USFSP Student Center
USFSP University Student Center
200 6th Ave S.
St. Petersburg, FL 33701

Topic Panelists

Frank Benyon
Following law studies at Bristol University and at the College of Europe, he practiced as a solicitor with Allen & Overy in London before becoming a partner with Clifford-Chance, working successively in their Brussels, Dubai and Paris office, dealing, in particular, with company, commercial and banking matters. He joined the Legal Service of the European Commission in 1980, advising on and drafting legislation, as well as preparing and negotiating treaties with third countries. He also appeared for the Commission in a great number of cases before the European Court of Justice in a variety of areas of EU law. From 2000 to 2010 he was Director in charge of the Legal Service's Business Law Team, dealing with the Capital, Establishment and Services freedoms, in particular in the banking, telecommunications and transport sectors. After retiring from the Commission in 2010, he was made Senior Fellow in the Law Department of the European University Institute in Florence and the seminars he held there led to two publications, "Direct Investment, National Champions and EU Treaty Freedoms", (Oxford, Hart 2010) and "Services and the EU Citizen" (Hart 2013). He has given university courses and lectures in Italy, Belgium, the UK and elsewhere and contributes to various publications, most recently the work edited by Bobek & Prassl entitled Air Passenger Rights Ten Years On (Hart January 2016) and a Wiley Compendium of EU law.
Douglas Herbert
Douglas Herbert launched his journalism career from the bedroom of his childhood home on Manhattan's Upper East Side, hand-writing the Sunday weekly, House News, for a readership of two: his mom and dad. A decade and a half later, in the early 1990s, Douglas landed his first foreign assignment, drinking his way through the vineyards of southwest France as a writer and researcher for Harvard University's student-published Let's Go travel guide. Douglas subsequently freelanced in the Moscow bureau of The New York Times, chronicling the chaotic reality of a New Russia in the wake of Soviet collapse. After reporting stints in Tallinn, Estonia and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Douglas joined CNN, initially at its financial desk in New York City and, later, at CNN International in London, covering the European Union and EU expansion. Today, Douglas is a Paris-based commentator on world affairs for France 24, an international news channel that he joined at its launch in 2006. Douglas has reported from nearly a dozen G7 and G20 summits, from Cannes to Québec to Northern Ireland; UN General Assemblies; the 2016 US presidential election campaign, from the national party conventions to Donald Trump's inauguration; and on the Ukrainian conflict. Douglas's guests on the France 24 Interview show have included Tony Blair, Samantha Power, Garry Kasparov and Stephen Breyer. For the past six years, Douglas has taught a graduate-level fact-checking course at Paris's Sciences Po Journalism School. Last November, he spent a week in Tashkent, Uzbekistan training a new generation of TV journalists in live reporting and breaking news. An avid Russophile, Douglas received his Master's Degree in Russian Studies from Harvard University. If Douglas could banish one term from the English lexicon, it would be: Fake News.
William Jordan
William Jordan served for 30 years (1981-2011) as a political officer in the U.S. Foreign Service specializing in the Arab world and France. His overseas assignments included Dhahran, Saudi Arabia; Tunis, Tunisia; Damascus, Syria; Amman, Jordan; Paris, France; and Algiers, Algeria, where he served in his final posting was as Deputy Chief of Mission. His responsibilities in the Arab world included reporting and analyzing foreign policy trends, especially as they related to the United States, as well as internal politics, human rights conditions, and the rise of radical Islamist forces. From 1997-2001, Mr. Jordan was the reporting officer in Paris for labor issues and internal politics. He returned to Paris in 2007-2009 to work on the Near East and North Africa as well as Russia (including during and after the 2008 Georgia crisis). Since retiring in Paris, Mr. Jordan has become an independent analyst, with frequent appearances on France 24, BBC radio, Radio France International, and CNN International. He has also lectured on foreign affairs at the French Ecole militaire and at the Paris campus of New York University. Mr. Jordan's foreign languages include Arabic and French.